Latest information on operational modifications for fall 2021 Roadrunner Roadmap

Courses

Lower Division Coursework

Course Title Modality * Day Time Instructor Credit Hours

Fulfills Requirement

HON 1000.0A1 Honors 101 Async Dr. A. Chapman 0 Lower Division Honors Coursework
HON 1000.0B1 Honors 101 Async Dr. A. Chapman 0 Lower Division Honors Coursework
HON 2301.0A1 Civic Ethos Async Ms. R. Gomez 1 Lower Division Honors Coursework
HON 2301.0A2 Civic Ethos Async Mr. E. Oviedo 1 Lower Division Honors Coursework
HON 2301.0B1 Civic Ethos Async Ms. R. Gomez 1 Lower Division Honors Coursework
HON 2301.0B2 Civic Ethos Async Mr. E. Oviedo 1 Lower Division Honors Coursework
CSH 1213.003 Accents, Identities, & Perceptions Mostly online, some in-person W 8:00-8:50pm Dr. W. Chappell 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core
CSH 1213.004 Community Communication Face-to-Face T 4:00-6:45pm Dr. L. Scott 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core
CSH 1213.005 Women in French Culture Mostly in-person, some online M 8:00-9:50am Ms. I. Hall 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
CSH 1213.006 Art of Wandering Mostly in-person, some online MW 11:00-11:50am Dr. N. Richardson 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
CSH 1213.007 The Roman House & Modern Home Face-to-Face TR 11:30am-12:45pm Dr. S. Rosenberg 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
CSH 1213.06H Art and Social Justice Face-to-Face MW 8:00-10:45am Mr. O. Giberga 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
WRC 1023.009 Freshman Composition II (Legal Focus) Mix of in person and online R 1:00-2:15pm Ms. D. Abdo 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
WRC 1023.019 Freshman Composition II (Environmental Focus) Mix of in person and online R 8:30-9:45am Ms. L. Ratcliffe 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
WRC 1023.020 Freshman Composition II Online only, some set time T 8:30-9:45am Mr. T. Wright 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
WRC 1023.040 Freshman Composition II (Environmental Focus) Mix of in person and online R 11:30am-12:45pm Ms. L. Ratcliffe 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 
WRC 1023.C5C Freshman Composition II (Science & Psuedo-Science Focus) Online only, some set time R 10:00-11:15am Mr. M. Gifford 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core

Coursework Fulfilling Experience Requirements

Course Title Modality * Day Time Instructor Credit Hours

Fulfills Requirement

AIS 1203.H1H HON AIS: Success & Stardom in STEM Online only, at set time MWF 9:00-9:50am Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H2H HON AIS: Success & Stardom in STEM Online only, at set time MWF 10:00-10:50am Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H3H HON AIS: Success & Stardom in STEM Online only, at set time MWF 8:00-8:50am Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H4H HON AIS: College of Science Honors AIS Mix of in person and online T 2:30-3:45pm Ms. K. Gold 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H5H HON AIS: College of Science Honors AIS Mix of in person and online R 2:30-3:45pm Ms. M. Juarez 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H6H HON AIS: ESTEEMED Honors AIS Mix of in person and online T 11:30am-12:45pm Dr. G. Taylor 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H7H HON AIS: ESTEEMED Honors AIS Mix of in person and online TR 11:30am-12:45pm Dr. G. Taylor 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience
AIS 1203.H8H HON AIS: Global Community Humanities/Social Science Honors AIS Mix of in person and online T 8:30-9:45am Dr. M. Newell 3

Experience 1: First Year Experience

HON 3103.001 HON Svc: Nightmares & Dreamscapes: The Politics of Fear Through the Eyes of Stephen King Async - - Dr. S. Howell 3 Experience 2: Service
HON 3103.002 HON Svc: The Fairy Tale Meets Modern Day Dystopia Hybrid 2/3 (MW) MWF 9:00-9:50am Ms. A. Hauck 3 Experience 2: Service
HON 3103.003 HON Svc: Unwilling Cargo: Human Trafficking, Past and Present Face-to-Face MW 2:30-3:45pm Ms. K. Glover 3 Experience 2: Service
HON 3223.001 HON Sem: Radioactive Dreams? Facts, Fictions, and Futures of Nuclear Energy Face-to-Face MW 4:00-5:15pm Mx. A. Villanueva 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3223.002 HON Sem: To Boldly Go: The Social Science and Philosophy of Star Trek Hybrid 1/3 (W) MWF 10:00-10:50am Mr. B. Floyd 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3233.001 HON Sem: In Search of Self: Writing and Reading Creative Non-Fiction Face-to-Face W 1:00-3:45pm Dr. J.P. Santos 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3233.002 HON Sem: Peace & Justice Sync MW 11:30-12:45pm Dr. M. Webb 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3233.003 HON Sem: Writing on Walls: Identity and Power Through the Walls of San Antonio Face-to-Face TR 10:00-11:15pm Dr. F. Matos 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3253.002 HON Sem: Paradox and Paradigm Shifts: Science in the 20th Century Sync MWF 11:00-11:50am Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3253.003 HON Sem: Decision-Making in the Modern World: No! You Did it Wrong, Again! Face-to-Face TR 2:30-3:45pm Dr. A. Cassill 3 Experience 8: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar
HON 3263.001 HON Prof Dev: Power, Culture, Consequence Hybrid 1/2 (R) TR 1:00-2:15pm Mr. B. Floyd 3 Experience 3: Professional Development
HON 3263.002 HON Prof Dev: Anatomy of a Future Doctor Sync T 1:00-3:45pm Dr. H. Hernandez 3 Experience 3: Professional Development
HON 3263.003 HON Prof Dev: Gender and Leadership from Sor Juana to Kamala Face-to-Face R 10:00-12:45pm Dr. T. Schwegler 3 Experience 3: Professional Development
HON 3503.002 HON Eng Lvg: Day of the Dead Sync M 1:00-3:45pm Ms. A. Lozano 3 Experience 6: Engaged Living
WRC 1013.H1H Freshman Composition I Online only, some set time F 12:00-12:50pm Ms. R. Glasscock 3 Experience 11: Elective; UTSA Core Requirement
WRC 4123.001 Hon Sklls: Cook. Eat. Write. Repeat. Face-to-Face TR 10:00-12:45pm Ms. D. Abdo 3 Experience 11: Elective

Course Modalities

*Courses can be conducted online asynchronously or synchronously, offline face-to-face, or as a hybrid of both online and offline types. Synchronous courses will meet online at a regular schedule while asynchronous courses will have you complete the online course material at your own pace. Face-to-face courses will be conducted in-person on campus. A hybrid class combines both online and offline course types. Hybrid classes may be denoted with a x/y notation where the class meets in person for x days out of the ASAP-scheduled y days. The remaining days are conducted online asynchonrously. All summer courses will be conducted online, with hybrid summer courses mixing both synchronous and asynchronous class types.

Course Descriptions By Type and SPICE


 

CIVIC ETHOS SECTIONS

A weekly, one-hour course that covers different approaches, philosophies and ethics to civic engagement. This course introduces the primary ethos of the UTSA Honors College curriculum. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 1 SCH course. This course counts as the Civic Ethos requirement in the Honors College curriculum.

  • HON 2301.0A1 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Ms. R. Gomez)
  • HON 2301.0A2 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Mr. E. Oviedo)
  • HON 2301.0B1 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Ms. R. Gomez)
  • HON 2301.0B2 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Mr. E. Oviedo)

CULTURAL EXPLORATION SEMINARS

There are no Cultural Exploration Seminars for the Fall 2021 semester.


ENGAGED LIVING SEMINARS

  • Day of the Dead

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is not Halloween. It’s a lavish multi-day celebration of remembrance to honor loved ones who have passed. This course will use the study of Dia de Los Muertos to explore cultural and psychological themes of grieving and remembrance customs, as well as it’s sharp rise in modern popularity, and the commodification and commercialization of tradition. Interactive course materials include videos, movies, online courses and readings, site visits, guest speakers, and a class creation of an ofrenda display for the university and San Antonio community. Students will have the opportunity to gain skills in project management, cultural preservation, research, program development, and creative innovation. This course does not have prerequisites, and is open to all majors. This course counts as an Engaged Living Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3503.002 (Synchronous; M 1:00-3:45pm; Instructor: Ms. A. Lozano)


HONORS 101

A series of weekly, one-hour classes and peer coaching on how to excel in the Honors College. Taught by Honors College Dean and Academic Counselors. Each section has the same curriculum and instructors. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 0 SCH course. Honors 101 is required and at no cost. Sign up on ASAP just as you would for any other course.

  • HON 1000.0A1 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Dr. A. Chapman)
  • HON 1000.0B1 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Dr. A. Chapman)

INTELLECTUAL ACHIEVEMENT AND RESEARCH SEMINARS

There are no Intellectual Achievement & Research Seminars for the Fall 2021 semester. If you are interested in non-course based Intellectual Achievement & Research Experiences, please contact the Honors Academic Counselor responsible for Intellectual Achievement & Research, Mr. Brent Floyd.


INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINARS

  • Migration & Human Development

Please note that this class takes place in the Summer F term.

This course will examine the relationship between international migration and human development. With a foreign-born population of 50 million, the United States is the country with the largest immigrant population in the world. Recent political events have brought a great deal of anti-immigrant rhetoric and attention to the negative impacts of immigration on the quality of life in this country. At the end of this course, the student will be knowledgeable of the historical context of U.S. immigration, will understand the importance of human development as a concept and policy tool, and will be capable of critically reviewing empirical studies on the impact of immigration on the welfare of U.S. society. Students will learn from readings and lectures, and from direct This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience.

HON 3223.01F (Synchronous; MTWRF 9:15-10:45am; Instructor: Dr. R. Zenteno)

  • Radioactive Dreams? Facts, Fictions, and Futures of Nuclear Energy

Since the 1950s, nuclear energy has captured humanity’s hopes and fears for the future, eliciting excitement over green energy and the specter of nuclear disaster as reactors were built to complement the energy needs of an ever-increasing population. This course explores the ways in which nuclear power has been understood, romanticized, and re-interpreted through the lens of different forms of media to shape and reshape communities and imaginations of a nuclear age past, present, and future. Students will produce docudramas analyzing their choice of nuclear energy film or novel within its historical, scientific, and social contexts. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3223.001 (Face-to-face; MW 4:00-5:15pm; Instructor: Mx. A. Villanueva)

  • To Boldly Go: The Social Science and Philosophy of Star Trek

“Star Trek? That’s about spaceships and aliens, right?” For five decades, through multiple iterations in movies and television, Star Trek has captivated audiences with its utopian future. As a genre, science fiction probes the possible using the speculative. While Gene Roddenberry’s sci-fi world of Star Trek is set in space, it asks its audiences to think deeply about meanings of life and the human capacity to overcome racism and sexism. In this course, we will use a variety of readings in political science, sociology and philosophy to examine Roddenberry’s world to pose the ultimate question: “Are we ready for a more just world?” This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3223.002 (Hybrid 1/3 (W); MWF 10:00-10:50am; Instructor: Mr. B. Floyd)

  • In Search of Self: Writing and Reading Creative Non-Fiction

 We read and write to learn more about ourselves and others in the world. This quest for wisdom has been a major part of literary tradition from The Confessions of St. Augustine’s to the most recent of contemporary memoirs. As this literary tradition has evolved, it has become increasingly innovative, incorporating writing techniques adapted from poetry, cinema, new media and popular culture. In this writing-focused seminar, by reading and viewing exemplary creative non-fiction works, students will develop skills in writing in their unique voice, creating a literary practice that expands self-knowledge. Building on weekly writing exercises, this “workshop” seminar will culminate in a significant project in writing and/or media. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3233.001 (Face-to-Face; W 1:00-3:45pm; Instructor: Dr. J.P. Santos)

  • Peace & Justice

How can peace and justice be most effectively pursued both personally and communally? Is peace primarily the absence of conflict or something more? To what extent is justice a process, an outcome, or an objective standard? By studying approaches to conflict transformation, restorative justice, and transformative justice, students will explore models for pursuing peace and justice in situations of conflict and in the aftermath of severe harms. Students will participate in a learning exchange with students at Dominguez State Jail as part of the UTSA Philosophy and Literature Circle. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3233.002 (Synchronous; MW 11:30-12:45pm; Instructor: Dr. M. Webb)

  • Writing on Walls: Identity and Power Through the Walls of San Antonio

In this course, students will discuss the definition and transformation of cultural identity by exploring murals, tags and graffiti in various neighborhoods in San Antonio. How do these artistic forms reproduce or challenge common identities, such as ethnicity, race, gender and class? Students will explore, survey, and define the concept of a "wall", including images and messages of identity and empowerment, and will talk with artists and designers. Students will be critics, guides, artists, and chroniclers of San Antonio’s walls as they build and design their own physical or digital spaces representing their self-identities. Students will create an annotated multi-media digital map of pieces of urban art using digital story mapping tools, as well as create their own “wall(s)”. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3233.003 (Face-to-Face; TR 10:00-11:15pm; Instructor: Dr. F. Matos)

  • Paradox and Paradigm Shifts: Science in the 20th Century

The 20th century saw the most revolutionary developments in all of the history of science. Newton’s world of absolute space and time was replaced with the radical new universe of Einstein and his mind-bending theory of relativity. Just as the scientific community was collectively beginning to wrap its head around these new concepts of space and time, the quantum revolution exploded onto the scene. The lessons of these golden years of physics challenged (and continue to challenge) our most fundamental assumptions of empirical science and of the very nature of reality. Scientific revolution was not restricted to physics; the 20th century also saw enormous leaps in the life sciences. Darwin’s theory would be revised and re-packaged into the ‘Modern Synthesis’, which served as the working paradigm for decades. Now, scientific insights revealed in the latter part of the 20th century are challenging many of the fundamental assumptions of the Modern Synthesis, and we seem poised for yet another paradigm shift in evolutionary theory.

This course will cover these remarkable developments in 20th century science. In addition to the science behind them, we will explore the social, ethical, and philosophical issues raised by them. Although we will make use of primary sources from the history of science, a scientific background will not be needed for this course. Historical e vents and developments will be presented for the general college student while allowing more in-depth analysis into the scientific content if desired. Therefore, this course is ideal for the non-science major who seeks to develop a better understanding of science in general, while exploring an unprecedented century of discovery. It is also an exceptional offering for the science major who wishes to delve into the history and philosophical implications of modern science. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3253.002 (Synchronous; MWF 11:00-11:50am; Instructor: Dr. C. Witt)

  • Decision-Making in the Modern World: No! You Did it Wrong, Again!

Every day, you have to make decisions.  Goat or almond milk in your latte?  Break up or make up?  Become a doctor and make lots of money or follow your passion to poverty?  The choices should be logically obvious but we always seem to make bad ones.  How did our super-sized brain, the result of billions of years of evolution end up so dysfunctional?  We will study the evolution of decision making and see how the complexities of modern life have added problems that lead us down the wrong pathways.  Hopefully, we will learn how to alter our decision-making machinery to lead us to better outcomes. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3253.003 (Face-to-Face; TR 2:30-3:45pm; Instructor: Dr. A. Cassill)


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINARS

  • Power, Culture, Consequence

Who holds power in our society? Who makes the rules, and who is above the law? This course will explore the variety of ways power, both formal and informal, impacts people every day. Using a variety of theoretical lenses, we will explore how power affects people differently based on race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender, and sex. The experiential portion of the class will entail a professional development training and practice to acquaint students with the laws and ethical considerations around professional conduct in the workplace. This course counts as a Professional Development Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3263.001 (Hybrid 1/2 (R); TR 1:00-2:15pm; Instructor: Mr. B. Floyd)

  • Anatomy of a Future Doctor

The future of medicine and dentistry requires an innovative and bold approach to dissect the ever-changing application process. This professional development course will focus on strategies to become a more competitive applicant to gain admission to medical and dental schools. The topics for this course include:

  • Developing strong analytical skills Strategies for MCAT/DAT preparation
  • Crafting a strong Personal Statement
  • Preparation for Medical/Dental school interview including conducting mock interviews
  • Compiling Letters of Recommendation Completing the Medical/Dental application and video sketches
  • Discussions about Medical/Dental school matching
  • Discussions on Medical/Dental school educational financing
  • Strategies and discussions on Medical/Dental academic success

The course will also include a grand debate in which the students will prepare arguments in support of using either augmented reality or a hands-on laboratory teaching modality for Gross Anatomy instruction. The course will culminate in the students developing a professional portfolio, which includes a final iteration of their personal statement, letters of recommendation, headshots, videosketches, and a completed application that can be used for their eventual application. Prerequisites: Honors College students who are declared pre-medical and pre-dental students. Instructor permission required: email Dr. Hernandez. This course counts as a Professional Development Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3263.002 (Synchronous; T 1:00-3:45pm; Instructor: Dr. H. Hernandez)

  • Gender and Leadership from Sor Juana to Kamala

Data shows that gender has a profound impact on how leaders are perceived, evaluated, and heard. In this course, we will examine the relationship between leadership and gender in national and global perspective to understand why American women continue to make less and hold fewer leadership positions than their male colleagues. We will evaluate the gains that have been made, identify what needs to change, and discover how we can focus our individual and collective efforts to realize that change. In addition to discussion, each class includes a hands-on workshop in which students will learn practical leadership skills to advance their personal goals. If this sounds like a course that is only for women, think again. We invite students of all gender expressions to learn the historical and cultural context of modern American ideas of leadership and reflect on the ever-evolving relationship between gender and leadership. This course counts as a Professional Development Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3263.003 (Face-to-Face; R 10:00-12:45pm; Instructor: Dr. T. Schwegler)


SERVICE LEARNING SEMINARS

  • Nightmares & Dreamscapes: The Politics of Fear Through the Eyes of Stephen King

What are you afraid of? Using selected works by Stephen King, the prolific author of contemporary horror stories, we will explore how our fears develop and how the media, politicians, and other social influencers play to those fears for monetary and/or political gain. This course will culminate with a personalized research project on one area of influence and the creation of a public service campaign to help college students better understand the power of fear. This course counts as a Service Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3103.001 (Asynchronous; Instructor: Dr. S. Howell)

  • The Fairy Tale Meets Modern Day Dystopia

We have all been raised with fairy tales that were meaningful to us. But what happens when the Fairy Tale meets Dystopia? Interestingly, more Dystopian fiction has been produced since 2000 than in the previous 100 years. What does this say about our sociopolitical zeitgeist? That we are retelling, reimagining, and longing for deeper and more realistic stories of struggle and overcoming. In Fairy Tales, the hero/ine often comes from the outside, but in Dystopias, they rise up from within. This has never been more true in our culture today. With multiple layers of challenge from pandemic, to political chaos, to fires and snowstorms, our nation is currently in disarray but has seen so many rise up from the inside to affect change around them. Many have mused that the American Dream has now become more of an American Nightmare. Yet still, we long for hope and look for stories to share, tell, and believe that will carry us through. What can we do to help the next generation meet in the middle? What messages seem important for children to hear? Do we still have fairy tales to tell? In this service learning course we will look at both the fairy tale and dystopian genres in an effort to reimagine some of the classics for today’s children. We will work together, using the Adobe Creative Suite, to write and illustrate a set of children’s e-books. No prior experience needed. This course counts as a Service Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3103.002 (Hybrid 2/3 (MW); MWF 9:00-9:50am; Instructor: Ms. A. Hauck)

  • Unwilling Cargo: Human Trafficking, Past and Present

What is “modern day slavery”? Would you recognize it if you saw it? How is it connected to the history of enslavement in the U.S.? Do you want to help? In “Unwilling Cargo”, students will explore of the historical institution of slavery and its connection to modern trafficking. Working with resources, federal and local, we will engage UTSA and nearby communities to amplify the voices of victims and work toward the abolition of slavery in Texas and the wider U.S. As a Service Learning course, students should be ready/willing to participate in external activities and trainings. More information will be available at the start of class. Content Warning: Students enrolling in the class should be aware that topics in human trafficking and slavery include dehumanization, sexual violence, abuse, and torture and may be addressed in the course, at times with graphic imagery or language. Students are advised to consider potential distress prior to signing up for the course. This course counts as a Service Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

HON 3103.003 (Face-to-Face; MW 2:30-3:45pm; Instructor: Ms. K. Glover)


SKILLS SEMINARS

  • HON Sklls: Writing for the Screen

Please note that this class takes place in the Summer S term.

Lights, Camera, Action! Do you love film and television? Are you interested in learning how to write to for both? If so, this skills-based course is for you! In this one credit hour course, you will learn the basics of writing for film and television. These skills relate to technical and persuasive writing, which apply to any major or profession. This course counts as a Skills Development Experience.

HON 3601.01S (Hybrid; MWF 12:00-12:50pm; Instructor: Ms. R. Gomez)

  • Cook. Eat. Write. Repeat.

Please note that this class takes place in the Summer S term.

This course blends the joy of cooking with the art of writing. Students will experience—first hand—the excitement and challenge of working with classic recipes or developing their own culinary creations for a tasting panel and, ultimately, for a digital or print cookbook for the Honors College Rice Festival. This experiential learning class will partner with the UTSA Recreation Center demo kitchen and with the UTSA Special Collections department. Taught by an award winning UTSA faculty member and advisor for UTSA’s Paesano student newspaper. This course counts as a Skill Development Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

WRC 4123.001 (Face-to-Face; TR 10:00-12:45pm; Instructor: Ms. D. Abdo)