Courses

Our curriculum, The Honors Experience (T.H.E.) is an experience-based, highly customized curriculum to fit each student’s individual goals. We encourage and guide students to pursue experiences outside of the classroom throughout their education at UTSA. Our curriculum allows students the flexibility of graduating with honors without adding significant additional credits to the degree. By graduation, students will complete a variety of Honors courses well as a set of signature experiences that can take place outside of the classroom.

*To see course descriptions, click on the course title.

Lower Division Coursework Summer 2022

Civic Ethos
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 2301 Civic Ethos Online Asynch N/A N/A Messimer, M. 1 Summer
A weekly, one-hour course that covers different approaches, philosophies and ethics to civic engagement. This course introduces the primary ethos of the UTSA Honors College curriculum. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 1 SCH course. This course counts as the Civic Ethos requirement in the Honors College curriculum.

Coursework Fulfilling Experience Requirements Summer 2022

Service
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3103 CITYMESTER: City Solutions in person F 9-11:15am Dawson, Jessica. Rodriguez, Victoria 3 Summer
Have you ever wondered why there is not enough food in the wealthiest country in the nation? What can we do to prevent climate change? How about taking a deeper dive into larger societal systems that have helped create social issues that require volunteers? This course will allow you to re-examine your values in connection with social issue topics that affect our local and larger community. All while simultaneously getting your hands dirty, having difficult conversations, and deepening a connection with a community partner. The goal of this course is to develop relationships with community partners, critically analyze volunteerism, and examine your journey to becoming a conscientious citizen.

Professional Development
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3263.01T CITYMESTER: City Skills in person N/A N/A Messimer, M 3 Summer

Intellectual Achievement & Research
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term

There are no Engaged Living Honors courses this semester. If you are interested in an Engaged Living Experience, please contact your Honors Academic Counselor.

Cultural Exploration
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3253.01M HON Sem: Trailblazing the Nationals Parks (study away course) in person N/A N/A Engates, K. 3 Summer

Engaged Living
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term

There are no Engaged Living Honors courses this semester. If you are interested in an Engaged Living Experience, please contact your Honors Academic Counselor.

Skill Development
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3601.01S HON Sklls: Writing for the Screen online synch MW 11:00-12:15pm Gomez, R. 1 SCH of 3 SCH Skill Development Summer

Lights, Camera, Action! Do you love film and television? Are you interested in learning how to write to for both? If so, this skills-based course is for you! In this one credit hour course, you will learn the basics of writing for film and television. These skills relate to technical and persuasive writing, which apply to any major or profession.

Interdisciplinary Seminar
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 4403.91T CITYMESTER: City Sites in person F 1:30-4:15pm Meyer, K. 3 Summer

Explore San Antonio and new urbanism is new and exciting ways. Learn directly from city leaders in various industries, critically examine some of the major issues facing the region, and explore several of the area’s most engaging sites. Become San Antonio savvy; learn the area, network with local officials, and develop urban living skills.

HON 3223.01F HON Sem: Migration & Human Development online synch MTWRF 9:15-10:45am Zenteno, R. 3 Summer

This course will examine the relationship between international migration and human development. With a foreign-born population of almost 50 million, the United States is the country with the largest immigrant population in the world. Recent political events have brought a great deal of anti-immigrant rhetoric and attention to the negative impacts of immigration on the quality of life in this country. At the end of this course, the student will be knowledgeable of the historical context of U.S. immigration, understand the importance of human development as a concept and policy tool, and critically review empirical studies on the impact of immigration on the welfare of U.S. society. Students will learn from readings, lectures, documentaries, and class discussions.

HON 3253.01M HON Sem: Trailblazing the Nationals Parks (study away course) in person N/A N/A Engates, K. 3 Summer

Leadership
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term

There are no Leadership Honors courses this semester. If you are interested in a Leadership Experience, please contact your Honors Academic Counselor.

Lower Division Coursework Fall 2022

Honors 101
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 1000.0A1 Honors 101 Online Asynch N/A N/A Dr. A Chapman 0 B5: first 8 weeks
A series of weekly, one-hour classes and peer coaching on how to excel in the Honors College. Taught by Honors College Dean and Academic Counselors. Each section has the same curriculum and instructors. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 0 SCH course. Honors 101 is required and at no cost. Sign up on ASAP just as you would for any other course.
HON 1000.0B1 Honors 101 Online Asynch n/a n/a Dr. A Chapman 0 B6: second 8 weeks
A series of weekly, one-hour classes and peer coaching on how to excel in the Honors College. Taught by Honors College Dean and Academic Counselors. Each section has the same curriculum and instructors. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 0 SCH course. Honors 101 is required and at no cost. Sign up on ASAP just as you would for any other course.

Civic Ethos
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 2301.0A1 Civic Ethos Online Asynch N/A N/A Ms. M. Messimer 1 B5: first 8 weeks
A weekly, one-hour course that covers different approaches, philosophies and ethics to civic engagement. This course introduces the primary ethos of the UTSA Honors College curriculum. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 1 SCH course. This course counts as the Civic Ethos requirement in the Honors College curriculum.
HON 2301.0A2 Civic Ethos Online Asynch N/A N/A Ms. R. Gomez 1 B5: first 8 weeks
A weekly, one-hour course that covers different approaches, philosophies and ethics to civic engagement. This course introduces the primary ethos of the UTSA Honors College curriculum. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 1 SCH course. This course counts as the Civic Ethos requirement in the Honors College curriculum.
HON 2301.0B1 Civic Ethos Online Asynch N/A N/A Ms. M. Balasundaram 1 B6: second 8 weeks
A weekly, one-hour course that covers different approaches, philosophies and ethics to civic engagement. This course introduces the primary ethos of the UTSA Honors College curriculum. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 1 SCH course. This course counts as the Civic Ethos requirement in the Honors College curriculum.
HON 2301.0B2 Civic Ethos Online Asynch N/A N/A Ms. R. Gomez 1 B6: second 8 weeks
A weekly, one-hour course that covers different approaches, philosophies and ethics to civic engagement. This course introduces the primary ethos of the UTSA Honors College curriculum. Classes in the A section are offered during the first 8 weeks of the semester while B section classes are offered in the second 8 weeks. This is a 1 SCH course. This course counts as the Civic Ethos requirement in the Honors College curriculum.

Honors Topics in World Cultures
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
CSH 1213.04H The Art & Politics of Wandering mostly in person, some online MW 11:00-11:50am Richardson, N. 3 semester

Wild things happen when we place one foot in front of the other. Strangers meet, kingdoms fall, and lives are changed. The history of humankind is a history of wanderlust, that particularly human propensity to wonder what’s on the other side of the horizon and determine to find out, come what may. It’s the basic stuff of everything from Biblical adventures to horror movies. In this course we will consider the world-changing power of the simple act of walking, of hopping on a bike, taking a road trip, or traversing a border. We will follow the footpaths of epic heroes, medieval pilgrims, and shipwrecked conquistadors, and march in metaphorical step with political revolutionaries, bereft mothers, and desperate immigrants. We will read, we will write, and, yes, we too will walk. And we will reflect on the art and the politics of those walks, on the apparently endless capacity of human movement across space to change lives and change the world. Building on weekly communication exercises (writing, speaking, etc.), this “workshop” seminar will culminate in a significant project in wandering via writing and/or media.

CSH 1213.07H Introduction to Japanese culture through the world of Anime Mix of in person and online MW 1:00-1:50pm Fukuda, M. 3 semester

Anime is a great resource to introduce the Japanese people's way of living, cultural products, customs, and perspectives. Students will learn the Japanese culture and expand their knowledge about Japanese society, for instance, education system, business culture, family values, food culture, communication style, history, geography, mythology, that are depicted in their favorite Anime. In the first half of the semester, students engage in cross-cultural analysis, group discussion, and reflection to expand their knowledge about Japanese culture. In the second half of the semester, students work collaboratively with a group to host a series of Anime movie nights to showcase their knowledge to the UTSA audience and develop their digital literacy.

CSH 1213.03H Korean Pop Culture: Korean Culture through Korean Films Mix of in person and online W 1:00-2:15pm Gong, D. 3 semester

Recently, the movie Parasite won 5 Academy Awards including Best Film as well as, the Palme D’Or, which is the highest film award in the Cannes film festival. Also, Squid Game was the number one series on Netflix for several weeks, covering the topic of social issues in Korea. Korea’s film and TV series industry has been thriving, and through this, students can learn Korean culture depicted from Korean films and TV series. They can be a great tool to understand a country’s culture and the people’s lives including their outfits, language, food, relationship, architectures, social issues, politics, and so on. This course is designed to strengthen students’ understanding and knowledge of Korea, Koreans, and Korean culture through Korean films. Specifically, students will learn and understand Korean culture through group projects, engaging activities such as cooking Korean cuisine together, immersing themselves in culture through authentic Korean architecture and traditional Korean instruments, and having in-class group discussions.

CSH 1213.01H Language problems in the real world in person MW 4:00-5:15pm Requena, P.E. 3 semester

Have you ever thought how many situations in real life have to do with language? From chatting with friends to writing legal documents, from learning to say our first word as babies to improving voice recognition technology for a tech company, from diagnosing a patient during a visit to the doctor’s to examining linguistic evidence while solving crime, the list is endless... A lot of what people do in their private and professional lives has to do with language. Addressing language-related problems/issues in the real world is a complex and dynamic task that requires not only knowledge about what language is and how it works, but also the use of interdisciplinary knowledge and resources. This course will introduce students to the study of language and will explore language problems that arise in different areas of society, including professional and institutional settings where students currently participate or will take part in one day through the exercise of their profession. The course will end with a project where students will be able to investigate a language-related problem of their interest, explore what the latest research says in relation to that problem, and come up with possible ways of addressing it.

CSH 1213.02H The Plants in Our Lives: Reforesting Ideas in person T 1:00-3:45 Meiller, V. 3 semester

Reforesting Ideas departs from the consideration of plants as compelling living beings to open-up philosophical explorations. We will tackle the work of contemporary thinkers who are trying to foreground the importance of plants in the sustenance of our planet. In an age of rapid environmental degradation and the loss of natural environments, the readings, materials, and explorations of this class seek to reframe long standing understandings of plants as passive and silent beings. Together, we will try to reimagine our entanglements with the vegetal world and the cultural approach to our green co-habitants. The class will integrate contemporary theoretical readings on Plant Studies with digital resources from various libraries and collections, rare and unique materials from the UTSA Library special collections, and other primary and secondary literary and visual sources to engage in interactive vegetal explorations.

Honors Freshman Composition II
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
WRC 1023.050 Comp II: Science-Pseudo Science Online only, some set time MWF 10:00-10:50am Mr. M. Gifford 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 

What’s real science? How do you know it when you read it? How can we identify when someone is misusing the language of science? This course focuses on the rhetoric of science and pseudoscience in the United States. Students will explore how the purveyors of pseudoscience consciously and unconsciously employ the power of rhetoric to make their pseudoscience sound scientific. During the course, students learn how research is translated to different audiences through writing.

WRC 1023.019 Comp II: Environmental Issues Mix of in person and online T 8:30-9:45am Ms. L. Ratcliffe 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core

In today’s argument culture, rife with partisan sound bites, how do we make our own voices heard? How can we move beyond “us-versus-them” language and build real common ground? This persuasive writing course invites you to research social and environmental issues (think climate change, environmental injustice, zoonotic disease, and others) through a rhetorical lens. It asks you to take a position on the issues you care about, and to consider how your audience’s values and beliefs—as well as your own—shape your stance. Perhaps most importantly, it calls you to consider how the best arguments involve both persuasion and truth-seeking. You will compose both written and oral arguments in the course, including an op-ed/commentary, a TED talk-style video presentation, and two researched academic essays. Prerequisite: WRC 1013.

WRC 1023.040 Comp II: Environmental Issues Mix of in person and online T 11:30-12:45pm Ms. L. Ratcliffe 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core

In today’s argument culture, rife with partisan sound bites, how do we make our own voices heard? How can we move beyond “us-versus-them” language and build real common ground? This persuasive writing course invites you to research social and environmental issues (think climate change, environmental injustice, zoonotic disease, and others) through a rhetorical lens. It asks you to take a position on the issues you care about, and to consider how your audience’s values and beliefs—as well as your own—shape your stance. Perhaps most importantly, it calls you to consider how the best arguments involve both persuasion and truth-seeking. You will compose both written and oral arguments in the course, including an op-ed/commentary, a TED talk-style video presentation, and two researched academic essays. Prerequisite: WRC 1013.

WRC 1023.020 Freshman Composition II Mix of in person and online T 8:30-9:45am Mr. T. Wright 3 Lower Division Honors Coursework; UTSA Core 

The ads we see every day have powerful suggestive properties, and it’s important as consumers to know what it is advertisers know about us, or what think they know about us, as they build a strategy toward selling us their products. Freshman Composition II focuses on rhetoric and persuasion in a classical sense, but this section emphasizes the rhetoric of advertising. This course also seeks to sharpen public speaking skills and helps students build the production quality of video presentations to make them more dynamic and thought-provoking.

Coursework Fulfilling Experience Requirements Fall 2022

First Year Experience
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
AIS 1213.H1H AIS: Success & Stardom in STEM in person MWF 8:00-8:50am Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience

This course trains the student in the process of academic inquiry and the proper practices of scholarship and presentation that are expected in the professional world of the STEM disciplines. Each student will choose a topic or experience-based project of professional interest, which will serve as the framework for learning. Working together as a team, we learn how to define and justify a project proposal, to articulate the project’s specific aims, and then carry them out. Throughout this process, students learn how to present a professional talk and to generate and present a professional conference poster. As the student’s project approaches completion, she learns how to write it up as a final report, just as a professional manuscript of work is written for publication within the STEM field of focus. There will be many opportunities to present the result of the student’s AIS project. Presenting the result of your AIS project in a public setting can serve as a valuable addition to your professional resume and can help you stand out above the rest in a competitive field of job applicants. If planning to go beyond your graduate degree, having such an accomplishment on record will be enormously advantageous when it is time to apply for graduate-level research program, dental, or medical school. Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this unique opportunity to create a piece of scholarship or to attain an achievement that is their very own, one that will continue to benefit them beyond college into their professional life.

AIS 1213.H2H HON AIS: Success & Stardom in STEM in person MWF 9:00-9:50 Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience

This course trains the student in the process of academic inquiry and the proper practices of scholarship and presentation that are expected in the professional world of the STEM disciplines. Each student will choose a topic or experience-based project of professional interest, which will serve as the framework for learning. Working together as a team, we learn how to define and justify a project proposal, to articulate the project’s specific aims, and then carry them out. Throughout this process, students learn how to present a professional talk and to generate and present a professional conference poster. As the student’s project approaches completion, she learns how to write it up as a final report, just as a professional manuscript of work is written for publication within the STEM field of focus. There will be many opportunities to present the result of the student’s AIS project. Presenting the result of your AIS project in a public setting can serve as a valuable addition to your professional resume and can help you stand out above the rest in a competitive field of job applicants. If planning to go beyond your graduate degree, having such an accomplishment on record will be enormously advantageous when it is time to apply for graduate-level research program, dental, or medical school. Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this unique opportunity to create a piece of scholarship or to attain an achievement that is their very own, one that will continue to benefit them beyond college into their professional life.

AIS 1213.H3H HON AIS: Science and Society in person MWF 10:00-10:50 Dr. C. Witt 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience

Since the dawn of man, there seems to have been an innate sense of curiosity and drive to explain to natural world. Man’s search for answers has directly shaped the beliefs and norms of societies for millennia. Reciprocally, the beliefs and norms held by a given society have directly shaped the kinds of questions asked, as well as the kinds of answers that were considered acceptable at the time. Exploring the nature of this two-way interaction reveals histories that can be quite unexpected and often amusing. For example, who would have thought that the first institution of modern science, The Royal Society of London, devoted much of their research effort to proving the existence of witches? One hundred later, the investigation into the mystery of electricity led to an unfortunate (and certainly underpaid) lab technician serving as a human conduit in an experiment on electrical conductance. Ouch. On the other hand, historical exploration of the relationship between science and society also exposes some of the darkest episodes in human history. For example, the ‘new science’ of eugenics inspired one of the most horrific episodes in history, the Holocaust. And one of the most remarkable feats in science, speaking strictly from a scientific achievement standpoint, led to the devastation of two Japanese cities with over 200,000 deaths in a matter of minutes. From the humorous and fascinating, to the tragic and transformational, this class explores episodes that illustrate the intertwined relationship between science and society. Because the very nature of this class is multidisciplinary, it offers something of interest for every major with ample opportunity for deep dives into personal projects to enrich any student’s career path.

AIS 1213.H4H HON AIS: Global Community mix of in person and online T 2:30-3:45 Newell, Michael 3 Experience 1: First Year Experience

The events of the past few years have emphasized the significance of global connections. The pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, climate change: these are challenges that cross borders and necessitate global responses. And, in a more mundane sense, we are all part of global society, from the clothes we wear, to the coffee we drink, to the ideas we think about, and the culture we take part in. While all Academic Inquiry and Scholarship courses seek to orient first-year college students to university life and their fields of study, this course goes further by examining academic debates and current events concerning the consequences of globalization, global cultural, economic, and political interactions, and ending with a look at enduring global challenges, such as crime, corruption, and climate change.

Service
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term

Professional Development
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3263.001 HON Prof'l Devo: Power, Culture, Consequence Mix of in person and online T 1:00-2:15 Mr. B. Floyd 3 semester

The lived experience of all people is shaped by power in various forms and in different ways. Through books, articles, documentaries, music, and internet resources; this course critically examines the impact of power on American society as a whole and us as individuals. Using an array of disciplinary approaches, students will explore how formal institutions of power, such as law enforcement and the courts; and informal institutions of power, such as social and cultural norms, impact people differently. Students will conclude the course by developing an online museum exhibit that explores the history and impact of those institutions on society.

HON 3263.004 HON Prof'l Devo: Gender and Leadership in person W 6:00-8:45pm Ms. T. Schwegler 3 semester

In the The Second Sex (1949), renowned philosopher Simone de Beauvoir boldly states, “If I want to define myself, I first have to say, ‘I am a woman’; all other assertions will arise from this basic truth.” Despite impressive advances, de Beauvoir’s words hold true today. Data shows that gender has a profound impact on how leaders are perceived, evaluated, and heard. In this course, we will examine the relationship between leadership and gender from the national and international perspective to understand why American women continue to make less and hold fewer leadership positions than their male colleagues. We will evaluate the gains that have been made, identify what needs to change, and discover how we can focus our individual and collective efforts to realize that change. In addition to providing students with the theoretical frameworks and vocabulary to productively engage key themes related to gender and leadership, each session includes a hands-on workshop in which students will learn practical leadership skills to advance their personal goals. If this sounds like a course that is only for women, think again. This course is essential for students of all gender expressions to learn the historical and cultural context of modern American ideas of leadership and reflect on the ever-evolving relationship between gender and leadership.

Intellectual Achievement & Research
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
CE 4953.002 Collaborative Web Mapping for Social and Environmental Issues in person TR 4:00-5:15pm Joseph, John 3 semester

Mapping allows for social and environmental issues to be better understood, and for better solutions to be proposed. This is especially true when the mapping is interactive and on-line, so that stakeholders (which in some cases may be every person living in a region) can add observed data, propose solutions, and can see all information and proposals in real-time. Case studies include the homelessness crisis in Modesto, California; barriers to hate crime and hate incident reporting in urban areas of the United States; child well-being in various parts of the world; air pollution due to local combustion processes; urban noise pollution, and more. The student will learn the science behind on-line mapping, the capabilities of relevant open source software, and how to use ESRI proprietary software for developing maps on-line. The student will have the opportunity to develop a collaborative on-line mapping website for a region and issue they have identified, or that they select from a list provided by the instructor. The student must obtain consent of the instructor to register. The student is to consult with their degree program regarding the possibility of counting the course as credit towards an elective.

EE 4953.004 Applied Natural Language Processing in person TR 1:00-2:15pm Flores, Mario 3 semester

The famous American philosopher, Chomsky assumes that human brains contain a specialized ‘module’ or ‘faculty’ dedicated to the task of learning and mastering a language. Of course, language skills take years to develop. If I tell you that today, we can make use of artificial modules that can learn and master many aspects of languages very fast, would you think in a question or application of this easy-to-use technology. Examples of questions that can be ask with this technology include: Can I train this “module” to identify the authorship of a text? Can I identify the sentiment of a customer about a set of products? Does the DNA code inside our cells have a morphology and syntax? Is it possible to find insights that mice brains contain also this specialized module? This course take advantage of simple but powerful Natural Language Processing (NLP) technologies. Lectures cover the practical aspects of the use of NLP algorithms to understand language. This technology is one of the most applied areas of artificial intelligence (AI) with high demand for professionals skilled at building models that analyze speech and language, uncover contextual patterns, and produce insights from text and audio. By the end of this course, you will design your own NLP application and answer your question(s). Also, during this course, you will have access to state-of-the art servers at UTSA. Today NLP applications are at the forefront of the coming transformation to an AI-based world. The course is designed and flexible enough for students of any area like Management, Biology, Medicine, Science, Engineering, etc.

GEO 2113.002 Fundamentals of GIS in person MW 1:00-2:15pm Cannon, Sandy 3 semester

Maps are an integral part of our modern world, satellites, data science, and GPS tracking have made the art of map making an essential tool for industries and governments. Any organization that needs to understand spatial and temporal patterns in an ever-changing world utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for location, navigation, data management, and spatial (geographic) analysis. GIS is a computer-based tool that uses spatial data to analyze and solve real-world problems that can be shared in the cloud and available almost anywhere on Earth. This is a beginner to intermediate level course for students who want to learn how large amounts of data are managed, used, and analyzed by the government, business, arts, and sciences. You will have hands-on experience using the industry’s leading GIS technology to create and edit maps, collect data, and analyze spatial data. We will review how maps are utilized to understand Green Infrastructure Planning, which affects our communities, watersheds, wildlife habitats, and parks. Information learned during this course will be utilized in a capstone project based on a topic of your interest suitable for spatial analysis. Prerequisites: CS 1173 is recommended.

Cultural Exploration
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3403.001 HON Cult Expl: No Shame: Sex, Gender, and Representation in U.S. Cultural History Mix of in person and online M 10:00-11:15am Ms. K. Glover 3 semester

What is culture? Who "belongs" in U.S. culture? Who does not? How do you know? In No Shame, students will examine how cultural attitudes toward sex, gender and race are made visible through advertisement, comic books, television and film, and other mediums. We will also investigate how those manifestations create and affirm social expectations of behavior and identity and how groups outside of those expectations historically create cultures of their own. Topics include, but are not limited to consent, Hip-Hop, ideas of God, the "Cult of Domesticity", Drag, and intersections in between.

Engaged Living
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3503.001 HON Eng Lvg: Day of the Dead in person M 1:00-3:45pm Ms. A. Lozano 3 semester

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is not Halloween. It’s a lavish multi-day celebration of remembrance to honor loved ones who have passed. This course will use the study of Dia de Los Muertos to explore cultural and psychological themes of grieving and remembrance customs, as well as it’s sharp rise in modern popularity, and the commodification and commercialization of tradition. Interactive course materials include videos, movies, online courses and readings, site visits, guest speakers, and a class creation of an ofrenda display for the university and San Antonio community. Students will have the opportunity to gain skills in project management, cultural preservation, research, program development, and creative innovation. This course does not have prerequisites, and is open to all majors.

HON 3503.002 HON Eng Lvg: Intentional and Sustainable Living in Costa Rica in person S 1:00-3:45pm Mr. E. Howard 3 semester

Meet a red-eyed tree frog, a blue morpho butterfly, and a blooming a bird of paradise. Learn and practice sustainable farming and yoga in the tropical rainforest! Our ten-day international experience (August 11-20) gives students the opportunity to learn and practice intentional and sustainable living on a working agro-ecological ranch on Lake Arenal, Costa Rica. Our destination is Rancho Margot: www.ranchomargot.com, where students will be hands-on with the biodiversity of the rainforest, renewable energy systems in practice, and mind-body experiential learning. The goal of the course is to immerse students in different approaches of what it means to live intentionally and sustainably in local and global communities. We will return to San Antonio just in time for the start of Fall classes, reconvening for the first Saturday afternoon each month of the semester to explore sustainability, mindfulness, and other kinds of intentional living in San Antonio. These afternoons have taken us to events, organizations, and places like Siclovia, Compassionate San Antonio, Confluence park, Gardopia Gardens, and Yoga in the Park. Subsidy by Honors College and the Alvarez International Study Fund means that the program cost of just $500 is inclusive of air fare, in-country travel, lodging, and meals.

Skill Development
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
WRC 4123.001 Cook. Eat. Write. Repeat. in person Th 10:00-12:45pm Ms. D. Abdo 3 semester

Why spend time watching cooking shows when you can create your own cooking experiences? "Cook. Eat. Write. Repeat." (WRC 4123) provides the setting for you and your fellow chefs (read: classmates) to plan the menu, kitchen-test the recipes in the UTSA Rec Center Demo Kitchen, and then write, design, and produce a customized cookbook. And then there's the 15 minutes of fame as you star in your own cooking segment hosted by The Paisano's YouTube channel. You may not be able to create culinary masterpieces, but you'll create a semester of memorable cooking and writing experiences. Bon appetit! This course counts as a Skill Development Experience.

PHY 4953.003 Fourier Transformations Using Mathematica in person TR 1:00-2:15pm Chabanov, Andrey 3 semester

The Fourier transform is a ubiquitous tool used in most areas of engineering and physical sciences. It is particularly useful in the analysis of “bid data”, like digital recording, images, sampling, etc. The purpose of this course is two-fold: (1) to introduce the student to the properties of Fourier transforms and their uses, and (2) to introduce the student to the program Mathematica® and demonstrate its use in Fourier analysis. The course will focus on both one-dimensional and two-dimensional transforms, the latter of which play an important role in optics and digital image processing, as well as in many other applications. It will provide different majors with both theoretical knowledge and hands-on experience. It is expected that by the time students have completed this course, they will have a basic understanding of Fourier analysis and Mathematica.

ENG 3153.001 Orature: Performing Literature Out Loud in person TR 11:30-12:45pm Fonzo, Kimberly 3 semester

Does literature live on the page? Does it spend out its days bound between the front and back cover, or is it alive in our voices, our faces, and our bodies? In this class, we will bring literature off the page and into performance. Words were spoken before they were written, so this class will explore various forms of literature that began and continue to interact with the spoken word. “Orature” is a combination of the words “oral” and “literature.” In this course, students will learn to read and perform a wide variety of orature in the traditions of medieval troubadours, sonneteers, abolitionist orators, famous novelists, the beat poets, rappers, and more. Literary devices such as rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, and repetition come to life with oral performance. With attention to these literary elements and others, students will learn to perform short stories and poems aloud in order to discover different possibilities of meaning. Students will hone their speaking and performance skills through multiple workshops with professional actors, including the Actors from the London Stage, who will be performing Shakespeare’s Macbeth on the UTSA campus. No prior experience with performance is necessary. Using Adobe Spark, students will create multimedia recordings that will enhance our appreciation of different forms of orature, and our class will culminate in a classic 1960’s-style coffee shop poetry reading.

Interdisciplinary Seminar
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HON 3253.001 HON Sem: Introduction to Clinical Medicine in person M 1:00-3:45 Dr. T. Fortshuber 3 semester

 

HON 3233.001 HON Sem: Unimaginable Encounters in Incredible Places: Literature, Media, and Art of the Paranormal. in person R 1:00-3:45pm Dr. J.P. Santos 3 semester

Writers, artists, and filmmakers have always been fascinated with the theme of the supernatural in human affairs. From William Blake to Gloria Anzaldúa, painter Marc Chagall to contemporary artists like Tony Oursler, along with film directors like Steven Spielberg and Guillermo del Toro, cultural creatives have explored narratives populated with ghosts, spectres, supernatural and extraterrestrial beings, often in transforming dialogue with ordinary humans. Using literary and artistic sources, along with historic films and recent popular culture, this seminar will examine the cultural meanings of these stories of the paranormal. For all of their references to high strangeness and the superhuman, what do these texts reveal about our humanity, about our struggles to understand ourselves and create a more just world in a mysterious cosmos?

HON 3253.002 HON Sem: Gross Anatomy in person W 1:00-3:45pm Dr. E. Hernandez 3 semester

Imagine caressing a human femur in your hand and examining the delicate bony prominences where human flesh once anchored a human being’s movements. Gross Anatomy examines the form and function of the human body at a macroscopic level. This course offers a uniquely immersive opportunity for students to appreciate the human body, replete with state-of-the-art technologies, including virtual reality that offers a fascinating 3D perspective of the human body’s anatomical architecture. The gross anatomy lessons will be buttressed with guest practicing physicians who will assess the anatomical skill level of the students, nephrology nurses, who will humanize the growing chronic kidney disease epidemic, which will reinforce the lessons in renal anatomy, mortuary science professionals, that will present a unique embalming perspective that will highlight the different tissues of the human body, and medical ethicists that will discuss the timeless value of the altruistic acts of those who have donated their bodies for the furtherance of medical knowledge to truly appreciate the meaning of the words Mortui Vivos Docent.

HON 3253.003 HON Sem: Conspiracy Theories and Pandemics Mostly in person, some online MW 11:00-11:50am Dr. C. Witt 3 semester

A growing number of people believe that all of science and society has been duped into believing that the Earth is a sphere when it is actually flat. Others adamantly believe that there is a global conspiracy to poison the human population by ‘geoengineering’ the planet through the spraying of poisons disguised as airplane exhaust a.k.a. chem trails. A first response to such conspiracy theories may be a head shake, a chuckle, and “What is up with that??” Afterall, the beliefs are pretty out there, but are relatively harmless. However, a growing trend in public attraction toward conspiracy theories in recent years has combined with a global health crisis that has not been seen in over 100 years. The combination has been anything but harmless. This course examines the phenomenon of the conspiracy theory, how it takes root, and why. Is anyone subject to the pull of a conspiracy theory? Or is there a general psychology associated with those who are embrace them? What is the role of the internet in general, and social media in particular, in the rising trend? While we will explore a range of the most bizarre conspiracy theories, we will focus on the most recent ones to emerge from the covid-19 pandemic and attempt to understand, for example, how and why a person becomes convinced that a campaign of vaccination is really a covert operation to implant a microchip in all humans for the purpose of mass control of the human race. Here we will all ask, “What IS up that??”

HON 3233.003 HON Sem: Peace and Justice in person MW 11:30-12:45pm Dr. M. Webb 3 semester

How can peace and justice be most effectively pursued both personally and communally? Is peace primarily the absence of conflict or something more? To what extent is justice a process, an outcome, or an objective standard? By studying approaches to conflict transformation, restorative justice, and transformative justice, students will explore models for pursuing peace and justice in situations of conflict and in the aftermath of severe harms. Students will participate in a learning exchange with students at Dominguez State Jail as part of the UTSA Philosophy and Literature Circle. This course counts as an Interdisciplinary Seminar Experience in the Honors College curriculum.

PHI 3033.001 Philosophy of Science Online, some set time T 1:00-2:15pm Tekin/Packham 3 semester

There are periods of time in humanity when a true inflection point in advancement occurs. Consider the industrial revolution, the (first) space race, or the dawn of the information age. It is not an exaggeration to argue that we are entering another such period, that of the rapid exploration of both nearby and outer space. NASA is planning a return to the Moon (~2024) and then Mars and the $10B James Webb Space Telescope has recently been launched. New telescopes or probes could find evidence of life on distant exoplanets (planets around other stars) or solar system bodies (i.e., Mars, Europa, etc.) respectively in the coming decades. SpaceX has already revolutionized the launch industry, with the global industry expected to be a $1.1 trillion market by 2040 (or much sooner). Mining of asteroids, harvesting Moon resources, and militarization of space is planned. But what are the ethical implications of these activities? How can the problems of past “frontier” exploitations be avoided? How can we protect even microbial life from terrestrial contamination (or annihilation), or should we care? What is the definition of life (there is no accepted definition), and what rights does it have? What are the ethics of billionaire joy-rides to space given their climate footprint? The course will explore answers to these questions from philosophical and scientific perspectives.

HON 3223.001 Design and Sustainability in person R 2:00-4:45pm Temple, Stephen 3 semester

People grow up in a consumer world where process is a single 1:1 transaction of trading money for things, where ‘wanting’ has more significance than ‘having.’ The concept of process is lost or there is an oversimplified view of process lessons that has never been further developed. How do things happen? Were do things come from? What processes bring them into the world? This course will investigate ‘process’ on the notion that awareness of process is a foundational concept, and a greater awareness of process is life-changing, especially in early education. Students will be introduced to the idea of process, how it happens, and how it takes place, first through understanding the forces and factors that create buildings and cities. Photography exercises will transform uninvestigated ways of seeing toward realization that the experiential world is a consciousness of possibilities. After we gain a comprehension of process we will apply it in a real-world scenario as fundamental to the idea of ecology the enactment of principles of sustainability, first in architectural design, and then in an analysis of a fast food enterprise (of student’s choosing) in a proposal to make it a more sustainable practice. This course has no prerequisites and is open to any Honors Student but specifically addresses issues better suited to freshman sophomore level students. THIS COURSE IS DOWNTOWN

Leadership
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term

There are no Leadership Honors courses this semester. If you are interested in a Leadership Experience, please contact your Honors Academic Counselor.

Honors Electives
Course Title Modality Day Time Instructor Credit Hours / Description Term
HTH 2413.003 Introduction to Community & Public Health in person TR 2:30-3:45pm Armendariz, M. 3 semester

What is your responsibility as a future health professional? As the global and national needs of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continue to impact our lives, public health remains at the forefront of championing for the public’s health and well-being. This course is a survey of the profession of public health and the competencies required of health educators, including examination of philosophies, ethics and current trends. Students will explore the scope of community and public health as we cover the five major content areas of public health. Through class discussions (both virtually and in-person), students will engage with one another to examine critical issues in community and public health, such as current trends, case studies, and/or research topics related to health disparities. As a final project, students will produce a public health campaign around a public health issue/population.

ACC 2013.008 Principles of Accounting I in person MW 10:00-11:15am Pendarvis, Deborah M. 3 semester

See Undergraduate Catalog

IS 3003.003 Principles of IS for Mgmt in person TR 2:30-3:45pm Davis, Terri L. 3 semester

See Undergraduate Catalog

MGT 3013.002 Intro:Org Theory, Behav & Mgmt Mix of in person and online M 4:00-5:45pm Phillips, Mark W. 3 semester

See Undergraduate Catalog

MKT 3013.015 Principles of Marketing Online only, some set time T 2:30-3:45pm Tsai, Bo-Hsien 3 semester

See Undergraduate Catalog

MAT 1053.10H Mathematics for Business in person TR 2:30-3:45pm Brucks, Jonathan 3 semester

Students in the United States hold a total of over $1 trillion in student loan debt. Learning how to manage debt, personal finances, and individual investments is more critical now than ever. In this course, in addition to covering the necessary algebra concepts to prepare for a degree in business, you will have the opportunity to impact the lives of students across the campus by researching and providing valuable feedback on financial wellbeing resources offered at UTSA. Your research findings will be used as a student perspective to inform and enhance campus services aimed at improving the financial literacy of all Roadrunners.

MAT 1053.11H Mathematics for Business in person MWF 11:00-11:50am Luna, Carolyn 3 semester

Students in the United States hold a total of over $1 trillion in student loan debt. Learning how to manage debt, personal finances, and individual investments is more critical now than ever. In this course, in addition to covering the necessary algebra concepts to prepare for a degree in business, you will have the opportunity to impact the lives of students across the campus by researching and providing valuable feedback on financial wellbeing resources offered at UTSA. Your research findings will be used as a student perspective to inform and enhance campus services aimed at improving the financial literacy of all Roadrunners.

Course Modalities

*Courses can be conducted online asynchronously or synchronously, offline face-to-face, or as a hybrid of both online and offline types. Synchronous courses will meet online at a regular schedule while asynchronous courses will have you complete the online course material at your own pace. Face-to-face courses will be conducted in-person on campus. A hybrid class combines both online and offline course types. Hybrid classes may be denoted with a x/y notation where the class meets in person for x days out of the ASAP-scheduled y days. The remaining days are conducted online asynchonrously. All summer courses will be conducted online, with hybrid summer courses mixing both synchronous and asynchronous class types.